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Nails

A Guide to Nails used for Interior Design

Types of Nails

There are many different types of nails used for interior decorating work:

Round Wire Nails – have a flat head and are used in rough carpentry, usually for framing etc. 25mm to 150mm

Oval Wire Nails – are oval and therefore less likely to split the wood

Panel Pins – are designed for fixing panels to frames

Annular Nails – have rings around the shanks and have very good grip, 25mm to 100mm

Coppered Hardboard Pins – are used to fix sheets of hardboard and won’t rust

Moulding Pins – are very thin panel pins used for fixing wood trims without splitting the wood

Escutcheon Pins – are used for fixing escutcheon plates (plates used to finish holes such as keyholes or boltholes)

Upholstery Nails – are used to fix fabric to upholstered furniture. They have domed brass heads for aesthetic purposes

Tacks – are used for the same purpose but are less refined and cheaper

Types of Nails
Types of Nails

Staples – are hooped shaped fixings (like a nail sharp at both ends but bent into a u), used to fix wire to posts. They are usually used outdoors and are galvanised to prevent rust.

Staple Guns – fire flat-topped staples and come in various sizes. Similar to the office stapler but stronger and often used to fix fabric to frames.

Glazing Sprigs – are the small square shaped nails used to hold glass in windows and picture frames before putty is installed

Corrugated Fasteners – are metal fasteners used to hammer across a joint to make quick butt or mitre joints

Plasterboard Nails– are rough galvanized nails about 30 to 40 mm long used to fix plasterboard to the framing

Masonry Nails – are hard enough to hammer into masonry but once there, they are usually permanent

Cut Clasp Nails – are the older type found in older homes. Usually 25 to 100mm long

Lag Bolts or Screws – sometimes called coach bolts are used only when one end of the bolt or screw is accessible.

To continue this topic select from below for related articles.

The Basics and Screws

Bolts

Miscellaneous Fixings

Glue

About the Author – Lee Brown

Lee Brown is the co founder of interiordezine.com, she has worked in the Interior Design Industry for over 23 years, specializing in commercial, hospitality, high end architectural homes and retail design. Over the past 13 years Lee and Chris Brown have been collating their wealth of design knowledge to provide free interior decorating education to the world. Make sure you register for your free ecourse today. Free Interior Decorating eCourse
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